SnappyScreen is the cunning sunscreen booth that sprays holidaymakers in just TEN SECONDS

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Applying sunscreen can be a messy and time-consuming pursuit.

But thanks to a cunning device, getting ready for the beach has been made much simpler. 

SnappyScreen, which was the brainchild of New York-based Kristen McClellan, is a booth with nozzles that spray holidaymakers in just ten seconds from head to toe.

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SnappyScreen, which was the brainchild of New York-based Kristen McClellan, is a booth with nozzles that spray holidaymakers in just ten seconds from head to toe

SnappyScreen, which was the brainchild of New York-based Kristen McClellan, is a booth with nozzles that spray holidaymakers in just ten seconds from head to toe

SnappyScreen, which was the brainchild of New York-based Kristen McClellan, is a booth with nozzles that spray holidaymakers in just ten seconds from head to toe

Users use a touch screen to select their height range and which SPF they would like to apply, with 15, 30 and 40 factors on offer 

Users use a touch screen to select their height range and which SPF they would like to apply, with 15, 30 and 40 factors on offer 

Users use a touch screen to select their height range and which SPF they would like to apply, with 15, 30 and 40 factors on offer 

A YouTube video shows how users use a touch screen to select their height range and which SPF they would like to apply, with 15, 30 and 40 factors on offer.

Once inside the booth, a platform the user stands on revolves so they get a 360-degree exposure to the cream.

The booths come with disposable glasses to protect the eyes.  

McClellan came up with the idea for SnappyScreen after she had grown tired of trying to apply sunscreen over her entire body before a day in the sun. She managed to raise $400,000 from investors. 

Once inside the booth, a platform the user stands on revolves so they get a 360-degree exposure to the cream. The booths come with disposable glasses to protect the eyes

McClellan came up with the idea for SnappyScreen after she had grown tired of trying to apply sunscreen over her entire body before a day in the sun and she manged to raise $400,000 from investors

McClellan came up with the idea for SnappyScreen after she had grown tired of trying to apply sunscreen over her entire body before a day in the sun and she manged to raise $400,000 from investors

McClellan came up with the idea for SnappyScreen after she had grown tired of trying to apply sunscreen over her entire body before a day in the sun and she manged to raise $400,000 from investors

She took her idea to product design company R&R Associates, which saw great potential in SnappyScreen and designers went about bringing McClellan’s idea to life.

It was originally tested at the Atlantis Resort and Hotel in the Bahamas, before being rolled out to other venues. 

Hotels and resorts that purchase SnappyScreen booths will usually place them by their pools or beach entrances.

They issue cards, much like credit-cards, that can be loaded with a certain amount of SnappyScreen credits. 

A person using a booth can swipe their SnappyScreen card before selecting their desired process. They then have seven seconds to step into the booth before the nozzles disperse the sunscreen.  

SnappyScreen was originally tested at the Atlantis Resort and Hotel in the Bahamas, before being rolled out to other venues

SnappyScreen was originally tested at the Atlantis Resort and Hotel in the Bahamas, before being rolled out to other venues

SnappyScreen was originally tested at the Atlantis Resort and Hotel in the Bahamas, before being rolled out to other venues

SnappyScreen makes most of its profits by selling the cartridges of sunscreen that go inside the machine. Hotels buy the machines at cost and then buy the four-gallon sunscreen refills in bundles sold by McClellan's company

SnappyScreen makes most of its profits by selling the cartridges of sunscreen that go inside the machine. Hotels buy the machines at cost and then buy the four-gallon sunscreen refills in bundles sold by McClellan's company

SnappyScreen makes most of its profits by selling the cartridges of sunscreen that go inside the machine. Hotels buy the machines at cost and then buy the four-gallon sunscreen refills in bundles sold by McClellan’s company

SnappyScreen makes the most of its profits by selling the cartridges of sunscreen that go inside the machine. 

Hotels buy the machines at cost and then buy the four-gallon sunscreen refills in bundles sold by McClellan’s company. 

She previously explained to CNBC that they think of the cartridges as the ‘Keurig cup of sunscreens’.

But McClellan is not out to just make money. A portion of SnappyScreen’s profits are donated to programs that educate in the prevention and protection against skin cancer.

The American Cancer Society estimates that there are 3.5million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer in the U.S. each year. McClellan believes that SnappyScreen can help to lower that number. 


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