World’s first portable lavatory cleaning robot is being sold online for $500

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Not your bog-standard toilet brush! World’s first portable lavatory cleaning robot is being sold online for $500

  • Giddel the robot is designed to scrub the rim and bowl of its owner’s toilet 
  • It weighs six pounds (3kg) and is powered by a rechargeable lithium-ion battery 
  • The robot clips to a specially elongated toilet seat and cleans the lavatory 
  • It is not designed to be operational when the toilet is occupied or in use  

Amazon is selling a robotic toilet cleaner for $499.99 (£400) that will keep the lavatory squeaky clean for you. 

The droid is called Giddel and is designed to scrub the rim and bowl of a toilet so customers don’t have to complete the arduous chore.  

It weighs more than six pounds (3kg) and is powered by a rechargeable lithium-ion battery. 

The hefty price tag includes the robot, cleaning accessories and an elongated toilet seat to allow the robot to clip on. 

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Amazon is selling a robotic toilet cleaner called Giddel (pictured) for $499.99 (£400) that will keep the lavatory squeaky clean

Amazon is selling a robotic toilet cleaner called Giddel (pictured) for $499.99 (£400) that will keep the lavatory squeaky clean

The droid is designed to scrub the rim and bowl of a toilet so customers don't have to complete the arduous chore

The droid is designed to scrub the rim and bowl of a toilet so customers don’t have to complete the arduous chore

It weighs 1.5 pounds (3kg) and is powered by a rechargeable lithium-ion battery. The hefty price tag includes the robot, cleaning accessories and an elongated toilet seat to allow the robot to clip on

It weighs 1.5 pounds (3kg) and is powered by a rechargeable lithium-ion battery. The hefty price tag includes the robot, cleaning accessories and an elongated toilet seat to allow the robot to clip on

According to the New York-based firm Altotech Robotics that makes the device, the machine is not meant to be used while the toilet is occupied. 

It comes fitted with a ‘non-spin brush for splash-free operation’ in order to obtain maximum cleaning purchase and efficiency.

A telescopic arm allows it to fit all sizes of toilet and to reach all crevice, including:  the rim, the inner rim, under the rim, the bowl, and ‘down to the exit’.  

On the product description on the firm’s website, it reads: ‘Giddel lets you take back your day and stop wasting time on menial household tasks.’

A telescopic arm allows it to fit all sizes of toilet and to reach the crevices of the ceramic pot, including: the rim, the inner rim, under the rim, the bowl, and 'down to the exit'

A telescopic arm allows it to fit all sizes of toilet and to reach the crevices of the ceramic pot, including: the rim, the inner rim, under the rim, the bowl, and ‘down to the exit’

On the product description on the firm's website, it reads: 'Giddel lets you take back your day and stop wasting time on menial household tasks'

On the product description on the firm’s website, it reads: ‘Giddel lets you take back your day and stop wasting time on menial household tasks’


According to the firm, nearly two thirds (64 per cent) of consumers would buy a robot cleaner to take care of this arduous chore. People claimed the main two reasons they ind the cleaning of a toilet tedious is because it is 'tedious', 'disgusting' and labour intensive

According to the firm, nearly two thirds (64 per cent) of consumers would buy a robot cleaner to take care of this arduous chore. People claimed the main two reasons they ind the cleaning of a toilet tedious is because it is ‘tedious’, ‘disgusting’ and labour intensive

The robot has been designed for use three times a week for three years, taking care of the unenviable job for the foreseeable future.  

A US survey conducted by Altan Robotech found four out of every five people (80 per cent) spend less than two hours a day on household chores. 

According to the firm, nearly two thirds (64 per cent) of consumers would buy a robot cleaner to take care of this arduous chore. 

People claimed the main two reasons they ind the cleaning of a toilet tedious is because it is ‘tedious’, ‘disgusting’ and labour intensive. 

It comes fitted with a 'non-spin brush for splash-free operation' for maximum cleaning purchase and efficiency. 

It comes fitted with a ‘non-spin brush for splash-free operation’ for maximum cleaning purchase and efficiency. 

According to the New York-based firm Altotech Robotics that makes the device, the machine is not meant to be used while the toilet is occupied

According to the New York-based firm Altotech Robotics that makes the device, the machine is not meant to be used while the toilet is occupied

The robot has been designed for use three times a week for three years, taking care of the unenviable job for the foreseeable future

The robot has been designed for use three times a week for three years, taking care of the unenviable job for the foreseeable future

A US survey conducted by Altan Robotech found four out of every five people (80 per cent) spend less than two hours a day on household chores and the robot is designed to reduce this 

A US survey conducted by Altan Robotech found four out of every five people (80 per cent) spend less than two hours a day on household chores and the robot is designed to reduce this 

WILL YOUR JOB BE TAKEN BY A ROBOT?

A report in November 2017 suggested that physical jobs in predictable environments, including machine-operators and fast-food workers, are the most likely to be replaced by robots.

Management consultancy firm McKinsey, based in New York, focused on the amount of jobs that would be lost to automation, and what professions were most at risk.

The report said collecting and processing data are two other categories of activities that increasingly can be done better and faster with machines. 

This could displace large amounts of labour – for instance, in mortgages, paralegal work, accounting, and back-office transaction processing.

Conversely, jobs in unpredictable environments are least are risk.

The report added: ‘Occupations such as gardeners, plumbers, or providers of child- and eldercare – will also generally see less automation by 2030, because they are technically difficult to automate and often command relatively lower wages, which makes automation a less attractive business proposition.’


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